How a Simple Piece of Copy Can Boost Your Business

How a Simple Piece of Copy Can Boost Your Business

It's not difficult to write great copy, but it's easy to do it wrong

By Daniel Kidd

Good, effective marketing copy needs to combine a number of essential elements. It needs to include a call to action, presented as a solution to the audience. It needs to effectively convey to the audience the benefits they will receive by following the call to action. It needs to attract the audience’s attention in the first place.

To achieve this, copy needs to be targeted and tailored to the needs and interests of a specific audience group. It needs to offer something new and valuable. It needs to be clear, understandable and honest, with a compelling headline that gives the audience a reason to read on.

The success of any copy is based on how much it achieves its goals. This normally involves some kind of conversion, whether it’s a click, a sign-up or a sale. Online, it’s easy to measure conversions with website tools, so you can judge whether copy is successful.


To measure the success of copy changes, you therefore need to compare the conversion rates from before and after the change. You could do this simply by making the change and seeing what happens, but a more robust approach is to compare both versions simultaneously by randomly serving different versions of the same page to different visitors. The easiest way to implement this is with the experiments feature of Google Analytics.

In our bite-sized media culture, content rules. It must be engaging, quickly conveying your brand values . Twenty years on, we all remember ‘Got Milk?’ and ‘Just Do It’ – but who’s creating effective, memorable copy in 2015?

Automotive brand Jeep’s ‘See whatever you want to see’ campaign is a clear leader, with simple copy conveying the brand’s strengths, while creating emotional connections with the consumer who likes to go off the beaten track. Of a similar vein is Apple’s ‘think different’ campaign. Both brand’s campaigns are customer focused, creating affinity between what they want and what the brand provides.